Surrogacy Minneapolis MN

Surrogacy has become an increasingly popular option to fulfill the dreams of parenthood. Read on to learn more about surrogacy in Minneapolis and gain access to surrogate compensation, surrogate diet plans, psychological screening tests, egg donation, IVF treatments, and infertility treatments, as well as advice and content on the pros and cons of surrogacy.

Center for Reproductive Medicine - Minnesota
(612) 863-5390
2828 Chicago Ave, Suite 400
Minneapolis, MN
Services and Treatments Available
In Vitro Fertilization (IVF)
Membership Organizations
Internet Health Resources

Data Provided By:
Reproductive Medicine & Infertility Assc - Minn
(651) 222-6050
2101 Woodwinds Drive, Suite 100
Woodbury, MN
Services and Treatments Available
In Vitro Fertilization (IVF)
Membership Organizations
Internet Health Resources

Data Provided By:
Center for Reproductive Medicine - Minnesota
(612) 863-5390
2828 Chicago Ave, Suite 400
Minneapolis, MN
Services and Treatments Available
In Vitro Fertilization (IVF)
Membership Organizations
Internet Health Resources

Data Provided By:
Councilman David L MD
(612) 545-9222
5 W Lake St
Minneapolis, MN
 
Coden-Festin Bernadette S MD
(952) 993-4900
6000 Earle Brown Dr
Minneapolis, MN
 
Midwest Center for Reproductive Health
(763) 494-7700
12000 Elm Creek Boulevard North, Suite 350
Maple Grove, MN
Services and Treatments Available
In Vitro Fertilization (IVF)
Membership Organizations
Internet Health Resources

Data Provided By:
Reproductive Medicine & Infertility Assc - Minn
(651) 222-6050
2101 Woodwinds Drive, Suite 100
Woodbury, MN
Services and Treatments Available
In Vitro Fertilization (IVF)
Membership Organizations
Internet Health Resources

Data Provided By:
Midwest Center for Reproductive Health
(763) 494-7700
12000 Elm Creek Boulevard North, Suite 350
Maple Grove, MN
Services and Treatments Available
In Vitro Fertilization (IVF)
Membership Organizations
Internet Health Resources

Data Provided By:
Lesser John R MD
(612) 863-3900
920 E 28th St
Minneapolis, MN
 
Kurachek Stephen MD
(612) 863-3226
2545 Chicago Ave Ste 617
Minneapolis, MN
 
Data Provided By:

Paying For Surrogacy

Any pregnancy involves cost and expense, and a surrogate pregnancy is no exception. How you pay your surrogate, and how much you pay her, varies according to her demands or the requests of the surrogate agency for which she works. The amount of money you are allowed to pay her will also depend on the state in which you or she is living. In some states within the USA, it's illegal to pay a surrogate more than what covers her medical and legal costs. This means that surrogates in these states basically work purely out of good will - they want to help childless couples, and are prepared to do so without profit. You should carefully research the legal regulations regarding surrogacy in your state.

Pay Arrangements

Regardless of whether or not your surrogate is working for profit, you will need to decide how and when to give her money. Whether you're simply covering expenses or paying her a salary for her services, all the parties concerned need to agree on the amounts and frequency of payment.

There are specialized surrogacy attorneys who can help you to draw up a sound legal agreement, stating whether payment is to be made weekly, monthly, or after the baby is born; whether the surrogate should send you the receipts for her pregnancy-related costs before your reimburse her; or whether you'll provide money in advance or perhaps open a special bank account to which she has access.

Types Of Costs

So just what comes under the category or surrogacy expenses? Well - a great number of things can be considered expenses incurred because a woman is carrying your baby. For example:

- Conception costs ( IVF treatment, IUI , embryo transfer, sperm or egg donation, etc.)

- Maternity clothes

- Vitamins and supplements (e.g. folic acid)

- Transport costs to hospitals and clinics

- Time missed off work due to pregnancy and birth

- Household expenses for the surrogate (a babysitter for her own children, her cleaner's salary, her grocery shopping)

- Medical insurance, scans, doctor's appointments, emergency treatment, etc.

- Additional costs if a multiple pregnancy is conceived (twins, triplets, etc.)

Total Costs

The total costs of surrogacy can range from nearly nothing (if the surrogate is a friend or relative helping you out of love) to $50,000 or more. The price depends on the surrogate you hire. Calculating all the different costs can be difficult and intimidating, so you are advised to budget for an emergency fund to be used in the case of unforeseen expenses.

Surrogate Agencies

The complexity of arranging payment of a surrogate is what drives many couples to employ the services of a surrogate agency. An agency can often provide you with a set expenses package. This will include your attorney's fees, your surrogate's expenses, her profit and her agency's profit. Agencies may charge total costs which are higher than an independent surrogate's costs, but many couples are willing to pay extra for the stress and worry w...

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Surrogacy

Using a surrogate mother to carry a child to term has been a successful choice for many infertile couples. However, the process is not without controversy and has ended in regret for some couples.

Surrogate Carriers
Surrogacy can easily be defined as the process whereby another woman carries their child to term. Upon birth, the child will be handed over to the couple, with the gestational carrier giving up any legal rights she may have to the child. There are a variety of reasons why a couple may choose to use a surrogate carrier. Women who cannot carry a pregnancy to term or who have a misshapen or completely absent uterus often decide to use a surrogate.

Using in vitro fertilization (IVF), the child is conceived using the intended parents’ egg and sperm to inseminate the surrogate. However, if either intended parent is unable to provide the necessary biological connection, a donor egg, sperm or embryo may also be used to inseminate the surrogate. In some cases, the surrogate herself may provide the egg used to conceive the child.

Finding a Surrogate
Where you live can make all the difference when you are looking for a surrogate. In states and countries that allow surrogacy, you can find a surrogate through an agency. The agency performs the necessary medical and psychological screening tests on all potential surrogates before agreeing to take a woman on as a client. The agency will also deal with the legal aspects of the situation, although it is a good idea for you to have a lawyer as well to look over all contracts before you sign them.

However, not all couples choose to work with an agency, preferring instead to find a surrogate on their own. In some cases, a couple may live in a state or country that has banned the practice of commercial surrogacy and therefore there are no agencies in place to help a couple locate a surrogate. In either instance, a couple acts independently to find a woman willing to carry a child for them. Often, a couple will ask another family member or a close friend to act as a surrogate. However, many couples have also found their surrogate through the internet.

Once a surrogate has been found, both parties need to come to an agreement as to what the terms of the pregnancy will be. Because of all the legal aspects associated with surrogacy, it is strongly recommended that both the surrogate and the intended parents hire a lawyer to ensure all parties are protected. Additionally, it is a good idea for both potential surrogates and potential parents to seek psychological counseling before insemination takes place. There are countless issues that arise from using a surrogate. All of these concerns should be addressed and dealt with before a couple becomes too involved in the process.

Pros and Cons of Surrogacy
One of the most obvious advantages of using a surrogate is the chance for a couple to have a biological child. This can happen when the carrier is inseminated with an embryo...

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Surrogacy And Donors

A surrogate is a woman who agrees to carry a pregnancy until full term, usually in exchange for payment, and to then hand the baby over to its legal parents after delivery. Donor sperm and eggs are an alternative means of becoming pregnant for infertile couples, even though the baby resulting from the pregnancy is not the biological child of one or perhaps even both of its parents.

Surrogacy Issues

The legal regulations governing surrogacy vary from state to state in the USA. You should consult a legal expert in this field if you are considering surrogacy as a method of having children.

What follows is a short summary of some of the issues surrounding surrogacy, which are dealt with on these pages:

How to find a surrogate - do you use a registered list of potential surrogates who have been vetted and approved by the authorities? Do you advertise in the newspaper (it has been done!)? Is it wise to accept a friend or relative who has volunteered for the job?

How to compensate a surrogate - do you pay a monthly salary? Do you pay large sum after the birth and the handing over of the baby? Who is responsible for pregnancy-related expenses (health care costs, maternity clothing, etc)?

How to conceive a surrogate pregnancy - will the surrogate be the baby's biological mother? Should you use an embryo conceived from one of your own eggs and your partner's sperm? How will insemination or embryo transfer take place?

How to draw up a surrogacy contract - how do we ensure that all parties to the agreement fulfill their obligations? What happens if the surrogate mother decides to keep the baby? What are the child's rights in the future? Will he be able to contact the surrogate mother if he wishes to?

How to bond with a surrogate baby - does having a surrogate child feel the same as having your own child? What happens if one partner doesn't feel the bond? How will a surrogate child interact with siblings who are biologically related to both parents?

Talking to your child about the surrogacy - if, when and how to explain to your child how he was brought into the world?

Donor Issues

Sperm donation has been a method of conceiving pregnancy for many years already, but egg donation is increasingly used as way of helping a woman to have a baby. In both cases, one or more of the parents who bring the child up will not be biologically related to the child. Here are some of the issues associated with sperm and egg donation which are dealt with on these pages:

How to find a sperm donor - do you go to a recognized sperm bank or use a private donation from a friend, relative, or even someone you contact via the internet? What are the potential health risks, if any, associated with private sperm donation? If you use a sperm bank, can you specify the race or physical features of the sperm donor you want to use? What are the costs of finding and using a donor?

IUI or IVF - how do you plan to use the donor sperm? If you ...

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